NX might not replace Wii U OR 3DS

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Lego Metroid Guy

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NX might not replace Wii U OR 3DS

Postby Lego Metroid Guy » 08.10.15 5:27pm

This might sound crazy, okay? Because everyone on the internet has been saying "I can't wait until Nintendo pulls the plug on this ridiculous fake console." But think about it, did Nintendo ever say anything about replacing Wii U or 3DS? The closest thing Nintendo has ever said to NX replaces Wii U is Miyamoto saying "buy the time a Metroid Prime game for Wii U was finished, it would probably be on the NX." But Nintendo says more about NX not replacing Wii U and 3DS than it says about NX replacing them. For instance, Nintendo's passed president Satoru Iwata, once said "...we do not intend it to become a simple replacement for Nintendo 3DS or Wii U..." Also, a graph was once presented showing NX, Wii U, 3DS, PC, Mobile Device and Tablet Joined through a new membership program, along with Iwata's statement "The membership service will encompass multiple devices such as our existing Nintendo 3DS, Wii U, the dedicated game system NX, which is currently under development, smart devices and PCs." Could this suggest Nintendo is working on a 3RD PLATFORM? It's not that crazy. Sony runs their PS3, PS4, PSP, and PSVita all at the same time, so why couldn't Nintendo, being twice Sony's value pull it off? :kraid:

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Re: NX might not replace Wii U OR 3DS

Postby Apothem » 08.10.15 8:33pm

Nintendo has said nothing more about "NX" other than it being gaming hardware of some description and their discussing in some manner of greater detail sometime next year. We have no idea what it could be and nothing more than baseless rumors and wild speculation to go on. Most assume it to be a new console to replace the failing Wii U. Some more adventurous believe it be some sort of merger of Nintendo's handheld/console paradigms. There are those who believe it'll be something completely different, either wholly separate from Wii U/3DS or complimentary to them. The point is we know nothing, and until Nintendo officially confirms anything no one can justly say otherwise.

For what it's worth, as I've said repeatedly here, I still don't think launching new hardware mid-generation will do Nintendo much good. Not unless it's a Wii-level fad, and even then it would only really further complicate matters for the company. The Wii U's poor performance is the culmination of almost two decades of mistakes on Nintendo's behalf. A single console generation isn't likely to correct such errant direction. They need to double down and bite the bullet; better support Wii U, and to a slightly lesser extent 3DS. With NX they either better have one hell of a gimmick or a damned powerful machine, otherwise no one will care in the slightest beyond the honeymoon period.
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Re: NX might not replace Wii U OR 3DS

Postby Infinity's End » 08.18.15 6:14pm

+1 to Apothem's post.
Major 3rd party devs have absolutely NO desire to make games for the WiiU. It is exactly what happened during the GC era. Everyone bought PS2s that gen because they had all the 3rd party support. Currently, it's up to PS4 and PCs. You don't have the games, you can't compete. Nintendo ain't the big and powerful company they once were 15-20 years ago. Zelda and Mario (MAYBE Smash) can't carry them through another generation, or IMO, anything anymore.
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Re: NX might not replace Wii U OR 3DS

Postby Khyron » 08.18.15 6:54pm

+1 to Apothem's post.
Major 3rd party devs have absolutely NO desire to make games for the WiiU. It is exactly what happened during the GC era. Everyone bought PS2s that gen because they had all the 3rd party support. Currently, it's up to PS4 and PCs. You don't have the games, you can't compete. Nintendo ain't the big and powerful company they once were 15-20 years ago. Zelda and Mario (MAYBE Smash) can't carry them through another generation, or IMO, anything anymore.
We are certainly in agreement that the big N is floundering at this point. As someone who does not follow gaming news/trends as closely as other here, I don't understand why. I love the 3DS and my kids both enjoy playing the WiiU. Nintendo can't keep the Amiibos in stock and there isn't a Pokémon game released in the past 8 years that my son and every one of his friends doesn't own. Where are they going wrong and can a new man at Nintendo's helm right the ship?

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Re: NX might not replace Wii U OR 3DS

Postby Apothem » 08.19.15 6:58am

Where has Nintendo gone wrong? That's a loaded question, and one to which almost anyone asked is sure to have a very different answer to and opinion on. One can trace some of their present problems all the way back to the company's draconian business practices in the late 80's when they first started making videogames. Others first developed and persisted with the release of the N64. For my money, though, I place Nintendo's greatest recent failings on the Wii. Most consider the system an irrefutable success, and as the 3rd best selling dedicated gaming platform yet produced - behind the PS2 and NDS - it's difficult to argue otherwise, but I maintain that the Wii, while having made Nintendo a great sum of profit, was also a short term and very pyrrhic victory.

Nintendo lucked out with motion controls, which is why the Wii is often referred to as a sort of "Hail Mary" pass for the company - a statistical long shot that had almost no chance of success but carried with it the entire future of the enterprise. Nintendo made the most easily accessible and usable gaming system ever devised and marketed it almost exclusively to the exact opposite of the then typical gamer demographics. They wanted children and families, young and old, and birthed what we now know as the casual console gaming market. They did the same two years prior to the Wii with the NDS, again making incredibly accessible and user-friendly hardware that soled more than 120 million units world wide. With such massive install bases, and a complete shift in design philosophy, Nintendo would go on to regularly sell millions - sometimes tens of millions - of software units and make record breaking annual profits. So how can such monumental success be detrimental?

Nintendo spent the entirety of the last generation cultivating a fickle consumer market, appealing to people who didn't care about the medium or where they played so long as they had a distraction. Casuals are unreliable. They are platform agnostic. They don't care for companies, brands, or franchises. They follow the tide, to wherever is either most popular or convenient. Nintendo had the immense benefit of braking big before the meteoric rise of the smartphone market, but once "iPhone" became a household name most of their market vanished into thin air. Casuals didn't - and still don't - care about the toxicity of the mobile market, only that they now had a device they could bury themselves in for hours on end, take with them anywhere, and occasionally engage themselves for a few minutes at a time. Nintendo couldn't compete with that, and as a result Wii sales fell off a cliff around 2010, and NDS sales had been trailing off not long before.

Nintendo never quite learned from their mistakes, though. Sony and Microsoft were able to weather the rise of mobile much better by having built up more conventional, long lasting demographics that were legitimately invested in both the hardware and the medium. By comparison, Nintendo not only raised a herd of easily distracted sheep, they then tailored almost everything they made to them, driving away nearly all but the most faithful fans. Nintendo was able to move millions of software units, but third parties were either unable - or unwilling - to adapt to the system's lacking hardware and unconventional controls, and were subsequently unable to turn much of a profit in all but a scant few of their attempts to appeal to the platform's demographics. The Wii was by no means accommodating to cross-platform releases, and it's market was toxic to much of what was selling so well elsewhere. Rather than shift their collective focus, most third parties all but abandoned Nintendo for greener - or perhaps bluer in Sony's case - pastures. With the Wii U, Nintendo would more or less ignore the pleas and troubles of third party developers and repeat these same blunders again.

Nintendo spent seven years appealing to the wrong people and driving away all their support. When it came time to succeed their systems, developers and publishers largely didn't care and most consumers had moved on. Nintendo spent years digging their hole, now they need to spend years climbing back out of it. New hardware isn't going to change that unless they either stumble upon a significant new paradigm or produce one monster of a system. Either way, both consumers and developers will continue to be wary of Nintendo for quite some time to come.
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Re: NX might not replace Wii U OR 3DS

Postby Khyron » 08.19.15 4:08pm

Where has Nintendo gone wrong? That's a loaded question, and one to which almost anyone asked is sure to have a very different answer to and opinion on. One can trace some of their present problems all the way back to the company's draconian business practices in the late 80's when they first started making videogames. Others first developed and persisted with the release of the N64. For my money, though, I place Nintendo's greatest recent failings on the Wii. Most consider the system an irrefutable success, and as the 3rd best selling dedicated gaming platform yet produced - behind the PS2 and NDS - it's difficult to argue otherwise, but I maintain that the Wii, while having made Nintendo a great sum of profit, was also a short term and very pyrrhic victory.

Nintendo lucked out with motion controls, which is why the Wii is often referred to as a sort of "Hail Mary" pass for the company - a statistical long shot that had almost no chance of success but carried with it the entire future of the enterprise. Nintendo made the most easily accessible and usable gaming system ever devised and marketed it almost exclusively to the exact opposite of the then typical gamer demographics. They wanted children and families, young and old, and birthed what we now know as the casual console gaming market. They did the same two years prior to the Wii with the NDS, again making incredibly accessible and user-friendly hardware that soled more than 120 million units world wide. With such massive install bases, and a complete shift in design philosophy, Nintendo would go on to regularly sell millions - sometimes tens of millions - of software units and make record breaking annual profits. So how can such monumental success be detrimental?

Nintendo spent the entirety of the last generation cultivating a fickle consumer market, appealing to people who didn't care about the medium or where they played so long as they had a distraction. Casuals are unreliable. They are platform agnostic. They don't care for companies, brands, or franchises. They follow the tide, to wherever is either most popular or convenient. Nintendo had the immense benefit of braking big before the meteoric rise of the smartphone market, but once "iPhone" became a household name most of their market vanished into thin air. Casuals didn't - and still don't - care about the toxicity of the mobile market, only that they now had a device they could bury themselves in for hours on end, take with them anywhere, and occasionally engage themselves for a few minutes at a time. Nintendo couldn't compete with that, and as a result Wii sales fell off a cliff around 2010, and NDS sales had been trailing off not long before.

Nintendo never quite learned from their mistakes, though. Sony and Microsoft were able to weather the rise of mobile much better by having built up more conventional, long lasting demographics that were legitimately invested in both the hardware and the medium. By comparison, Nintendo not only raised a herd of easily distracted sheep, they then tailored almost everything they made to them, driving away nearly all but the most faithful fans. Nintendo was able to move millions of software units, but third parties were either unable - or unwilling - to adapt to the system's lacking hardware and unconventional controls, and were subsequently unable to turn much of a profit in all but a scant few of their attempts to appeal to the platform's demographics. The Wii was by no means accommodating to cross-platform releases, and it's market was toxic to much of what was selling so well elsewhere. Rather than shift their collective focus, most third parties all but abandoned Nintendo for greener - or perhaps bluer in Sony's case - pastures. With the Wii U, Nintendo would more or less ignore the pleas and troubles of third party developers and repeat these same blunders again.

Nintendo spent seven years appealing to the wrong people and driving away all their support. When it came time to succeed their systems, developers and publishers largely didn't care and most consumers had moved on. Nintendo spent years digging their hole, now they need to spend years climbing back out of it. New hardware isn't going to change that unless they either stumble upon a significant new paradigm or produce one monster of a system. Either way, both consumers and developers will continue to be wary of Nintendo for quite some time to come.
Thank you for the very thoughtful response, Apothem. I appreciate the time you took to write that to answer my question so completely :thumbsup:

I've heard others argue that N missed the boat with mobile games and have suggested that they sprint to catch up. I would disagree and I suspect that you feel the same. Unless there is a profitable market segment that we don't yet know of, it would appear that Nintendo must aim to compete directly with Sony and Microsoft for their market. Is that a smart move? Not in 2015 it isn't. My question is: Where are all of the 8-13 year old gamers? I poured countless hours of my pre-teen years into the Phantasy Star games. Have every last one of those kids traded dungeon crawling, grinding, exploring, strategizing and becoming a little cartographer to swipe a finger across a screen? Probably not. Most of them are probably playing Silent Hill and Assassin's Creed and GTA and countless other games that I'd never even allow into my home, let alone permit my kids to play.

But from the 8bit era up through the N64, that was Nintendo's market. Sure there were more grown up games on the NES (Faxanadu, Final Fantasy, Ultima); the SNES (that's a long list and you know them all already) as well as the N64 (Perfect Dark, Golden Eye, Conker's), but those systems were marketed towards kids (read: boys) between the ages of 5 and, at best, 15. Now I've got nephews who have been playing M rated games since Kindergarten :evil: They'd look at a system that is geared towards their age bracket, say it was for babies, and ritualistically sacrifice it. Maybe I'm too uninformed when it comes to this and am trying to have a conversation that's out of my league, but the future of some great game franchises depends on Nintendo finding their feet again. A future without Metroid would be sad indeed.

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Re: NX might not replace Wii U OR 3DS

Postby Apothem » 08.19.15 5:26pm

Nintendo's demographics either went to mobile or more competitive focused multiplayer games, both markets Nintendo has little stake in. The best thing Nintendo can do right now is continue to support their systems while producing uniquely Nintendo experience, all the while looking to venture forward into new territory. Splatoon is a fantastic example of that. Nintendo didn't simply follow a trend, they took the fundamentals and did their own thing with it. Sometimes that doesn't work, but the market overall better rewards creativity than just following the leader.

The problem therein lies that Nintendo has neither the capital nor the manpower to float development for two systems on their own. If third parties won't willingly bring their games to the platform, or make specific experiences for it, then one excellent way of including them in allowing to play with Nintendo's toys. Allowing developers to make games with Nintendo properties - such as Hyrule Warriors, Pokken Fighters, and FE x SMT - is a fantastic way of garnering growing support while limiting the risk of investment on their behalf. Now Nintendo needs to ramp that paradigm up, contracting with more eastern and western studios to use their IP for future projects. It also wouldn't hurt to include indie developers, either, especially as digital front runners and for support in Nintendo's burgeoning mobile initiative.

If Nintendo can accept moderate success, something almost no other company in the industry is willing to do, then the Wii U and 3DS could serve them well. Otherwise they'll wind up gambling tens of millions of dollars - or billions of yen, I suppose - on becoming the next big thing and most likely fail.
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